"new york times"
Monday, April 30, 2012
"Here’s a window into a tragedy within the American military: For every soldier killed on the battlefield this year, about 25 veterans are dying by their own hands."

New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof • In an opinion piece on the death of soldiers after they return home. A few other key stats — more former soldiers have committed suicide after returning home than died in combat in Afghanistan and Iraq combined, being a veteran doubles the risk of suicide, and being a veteran between ages 17 and 24 quadruples the risk. Yikes. Read up on this disturbing trend. (via shortformblog)

People who deflect criticism with SUPPORT THE TROOPS, I’m looking at you. These people need help, badly.

(via josipbeantito)

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Drug Policy as Race Policy: Best Seller Galvanizes the Debate | NYT 

March 6, 2012—“The New Jim Crow” [which has spent six weeks on the New York Times paperback nonfiction best-seller list] arrives at a receptive moment, when declining crime rates and exploding prison budgets have made conservatives and liberals alike more ready to question the wisdom of keeping nearly 1 in 100 Americans behind bars. But Professor Alexander, who teaches at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University, said in an interview that the more provocative claims of her book did not come easily to her. When she first encountered the “New Jim Crow” metaphor on a protest sign in Oakland, Calif., a decade ago, she was a civil rights lawyer with an impeccable résumé — Stanford Law School, a Supreme Court clerkship — and was leery of embracing arguments that might be considered, as she put it, “crazy.”
Professor Alexander knew that African-Americans were overrepresented in prison, though she resisted the idea that this was anything more than unequal implementation of colorblind laws. But her work as director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Racial Justice Project in Northern California, she said, opened her eyes to the extent of the lifelong exclusion many offenders face, including job discrimination, elimination from juries and voter rolls, and even disqualification from food stamps, public housing and student loans. 
“It’s easy to be completely unaware that this vast new system of racial and social control has emerged,” she said. “Unlike in Jim Crow days, there were no ‘Whites Only’ signs. This system is out of sight, out of mind.”
full article

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Drug Policy as Race Policy: Best Seller Galvanizes the Debate | NYT 

March 6, 2012—“The New Jim Crow” [which has spent six weeks on the New York Times paperback nonfiction best-seller list] arrives at a receptive moment, when declining crime rates and exploding prison budgets have made conservatives and liberals alike more ready to question the wisdom of keeping nearly 1 in 100 Americans behind bars. But Professor Alexander, who teaches at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State University, said in an interview that the more provocative claims of her book did not come easily to her. When she first encountered the “New Jim Crow” metaphor on a protest sign in Oakland, Calif., a decade ago, she was a civil rights lawyer with an impeccable résumé — Stanford Law School, a Supreme Court clerkship — and was leery of embracing arguments that might be considered, as she put it, “crazy.”

Professor Alexander knew that African-Americans were overrepresented in prison, though she resisted the idea that this was anything more than unequal implementation of colorblind laws. But her work as director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Racial Justice Project in Northern California, she said, opened her eyes to the extent of the lifelong exclusion many offenders face, including job discrimination, elimination from juries and voter rolls, and even disqualification from food stamps, public housing and student loans. 

“It’s easy to be completely unaware that this vast new system of racial and social control has emerged,” she said. “Unlike in Jim Crow days, there were no ‘Whites Only’ signs. This system is out of sight, out of mind.”

full article

Wednesday, November 2, 2011
"

Her husband had raped her again that night, this time more violently than ever in their 15-year marriage. He forced himself on her repeatedly, he choked her and threatened to kill her.

When she fled in the early hours of March 23, 2008 — down the stairwell, through the courtyard, into the street and up to a taxi — he caught up before the driver could pull away. She ran on, finally reaching a police station.

“You have to be ready to leave behind your entire life, your identity of a wife, of a normal family,” the woman, now 43, said in an interview. “You have to be ready to call the man you once loved a rapist.

“I just couldn’t do it before. But that night I knew, if I didn’t leave him, I would die.”

"

In Norway, Gender Equality Does Not Extend to the Bedroom - NYTimes.com

One reason I could never agree with Pierre Elliot Treudeau’s blanket, “The state has no place in the bedrooms of the nation,” when he was PM. The state may have no place between willing individuals… But this isn’t that.

(via eddieatthegov)

Saturday, April 2, 2011
"You go into a community and they will vote 80 percent to 20 percent in favor of a tougher Clean Air Act, but if you ask them to devote 20 minutes a year to having their car emissions inspected, they will vote 80 to 20 against it. We are a long way in this country from taking individual responsibility for the environmental problem."
William D. Ruckelshaus, former EPA administrator, New York Times, November 30, 1988 (via mohandasgandhi)
Wednesday, January 12, 2011
Monday, January 10, 2011
Assassins and American History.

"Does political speech lead to acts of political violence?

Since Jared Loughner shot Representative Gabrielle Giffords and 19 others at a Safeway in Tucson on Saturday, there has been a vigorous debate over whether partisan vitriol played a role in encouraging a mentally unbalanced young man to act.

What does American history tell us about the relationship between violent acts and the political acrimony of the day?”

A collection of a few short opinions on the role of political rhetoric in violence of the day, and whether it’s even right to point fingers at our public figures, rather than mental health systems or, obviously, our gun control measures.

Friday, January 7, 2011
"Hello!”

“There are plenty of progressive champions lobbying, rallying, exposing, suing and organizing at the national, state and local level."

In a letter To The New York Times, Ralph Nader takes issue with the paper’s editorial asserting that Tea Party victories show there is “no progressive champion” for the poor and powerless.

The problem, he says, is that the mainstream media, including The New York Times, fails to cover their efforts.

Progressive.org

(via brooklynmutt)

Thursday, January 6, 2011
Blizzard cleanup is subject of federal investigation
Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn have opened a preliminary investigation into allegations that disgruntled sanitation workers sabotaged the cleanup after the blizzard last week that left some neighborhoods snowbound for days, people who have been briefed on the inquiry said Tuesday.

The investigation is focusing on whether there was a work slowdown and, if so, whether it was an effort to pad overtime. If the actions took place, two of those people said, they could constitute wire fraud or wire fraud conspiracy, both federal crimes. Both people spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation was continuing


I have just the one emoticon for this situation, and that emoticon is:

:O!!!

Particularly given we’re supposed to get more snow tonight/tomorrow. :OOO!

(Source: neighborhoodr)

Saturday, January 1, 2011
Thursday, November 4, 2010
kateoplis:

huffingtonpost: nightline:


The New York Times is blogging the Civil War !?!? Awesome.

As we recover from our election coverage marathon, this feels like something: Awesome.

One more time with feeling: awesome.

kateoplis:

huffingtonpost: nightline:

The New York Times is blogging the Civil War !?!? Awesome.

As we recover from our election coverage marathon, this feels like something: Awesome.

One more time with feeling: awesome.

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